2015 Gisborne-Hawkes Bay Architecture Awards

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Education Award: Iona College Information Resource Centre by Stevens Lawson Architects.

Education Award: Iona College Information Resource Centre by Stevens Lawson Architects. Image: Mark Smith

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Education Award: Te Wānanga o Aotearoa Gisborne Campus by APG Architects.

Education Award: Te Wānanga o Aotearoa Gisborne Campus by APG Architects. Image: Richard Wood

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Hospitality and Retail Award: F.G. Smith Building by Paris Magdalinos Architects.

Hospitality and Retail Award: F.G. Smith Building by Paris Magdalinos Architects. Image: Jeff Brass

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Hospitality and Retail Award: Monica Loves by Nott Architects.

Hospitality and Retail Award: Monica Loves by Nott Architects. Image: Meredith Lord

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Housing Award: Longbush House by Salmond Reed Architects.

Housing Award: Longbush House by Salmond Reed Architects. Image: Patrick Reynolds

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Housing Award: McClintock House by Clarkson Architects.

Housing Award: McClintock House by Clarkson Architects. Image: Richard Brimmer

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Planning and Urban Design Award: Paxies Lane by Paris Magdalinos Architects.

Planning and Urban Design Award: Paxies Lane by Paris Magdalinos Architects. Image: Jeff Brass

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Public Architecture Award: The Blyth Performing Arts Centre by Stevens Lawson Architects.

Public Architecture Award: The Blyth Performing Arts Centre by Stevens Lawson Architects. Image: Mark Smith

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Small Project Architecture Award: John's House Pavilion by Bossley Architects and Citrus Studio.

Small Project Architecture Award: John’s House Pavilion by Bossley Architects and Citrus Studio. Image: Jodie Robertson

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Small Project Architecture Award: William Nelson Park Public Toilet by Citrus Studio Architecture.

Small Project Architecture Award: William Nelson Park Public Toilet by Citrus Studio Architecture. Image: Supplied

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The adaptive re-use of existing structures and new buildings at two educational institutions have emerged as features amongst the ten winning projects at the 2015 Gisborne-Hawkes Bay Architecture Awards. The awards were announced on the evening of Friday 5 June at MTG Hawkes Bay in Napier.

Tracey Thomson-Gray, convenor of the awards jury, was impressed by both the quality and range of buildings submitted for peer review. “We visited a number of refurbishment projects and it was very pleasing to see clients and architects deciding to re-use existing buildings,” Thomson-Gray said. “This has resulted in some wonderful repurposed buildings and spaces.”

Full list of winners with judges citations below:

EDUCATION AWARDS:

Iona College Information Resource Centre, Havelock North by Stevens Lawson Architects

Education Award: Iona College Information Resource Centre by Stevens Lawson Architects. Image:  Mark Smith

The Information Resource Centre is a multi-functional education facility for the 21st century, contemporary and bold in its architectural expression, but respectful of its adjacent historic buildings in form, scale and reference. The rhythmic vertical fins and building form are juxtaposed with the curves, void and volumes of the interiors. A clean and refined palette of materials and resolution of detail further enhances the experience. A range of distinct learning environments inspire, stimulate and encourage open and enquiring minds.

Te Wānanga o Aotearoa Gisborne Campus by APG Architects

Education Award: Te Wānanga o Aotearoa Gisborne Campus by APG Architects. Image:  Richard Wood

An existing two-storey concrete hotel block on the campus has been converted to staff offices by way of two strong architectural decisions. A horizontal opening through the length creates connected office bays, and a vertical opening over a central social space provides a light-filled core to a previously dark segmented building. The spatial arrangement which results from a simple solution, the commitment to building reuse and the careful linking of exterior elements to the existing campus is to be strongly commended.

Resene Colour Award:
The yellow highlights selected for this office interior relate to a mature kōwhai tree directly outside the social space. The thoughtful decisions to retain plain concrete elements, painted block and ply linings and to contrast these with bright colour in fixtures and furnishings has resulted in an elegant and delightful interior space.

HOSPITALITY AND RETAIL AWARDS:

F. G. Smith Building, Napier by Paris Magdalinos Architects

Hospitality and Retail Award: F.G. Smith Building by Paris Magdalinos Architects. Image:  Jeff Brass

The F. G. Smith Building successfully redefines a derelict former transport hub as a social centre within the historic Ahuriri port quarter of Napier providing an impact beyond its own footprint. Structural features of the industrial shed are redefined as design elements celebrating contemporary food and fashion with an industrial aesthetic. Openings to a courtyard and kitchen garden successfully provide exterior dining space, light and a permeable boundary with neighbouring sites and the streetscape.

Monica Loves by Napier Nott Architects

Hospitality and Retail Award: Monica Loves by Nott Architects. Image:  Meredith Lord

Claiming the rear of a warehouse and side lane this small bar has allowed a penetration to the lost interior laneways of a city very much about façades. A huge door and flip-up window signal the bar’s presence and the interior fitout reveals a strong and stylish industrial aesthetic in response to its original purpose. The selected site has allowed cross connections to adjacent retail and restaurants and the design has created intimate interior and exterior spaces to inhabit and enjoy.

Resene Colour Award:
Black windows, black walls, and black steel elements successfully enhance the industrial aesthetic of this small bar. This colour has been used to great effect against the existing patina of the service lanes, and internally against timber elements and green fabrics to create a cosy gathering space.

HOUSING AWARDS: 

Longbush House by Salmond Reed Architects

Housing Award: Longbush House by Salmond Reed Architects. Image:  Patrick Reynolds

Conceived as a building in a landscape, the house successfully relates to the native bush line to the south with a series of layered mass walls with small openings, and to the open expanse of the river valley beyond with large glazed openings, void and volume. The interior finishes of native timber panelling and exposed rafters are refined to a high detail and exhibit quality craftsmanship and a comforting interior. The project is also to be commended in its thoughtful preservation of two archaeological sites. The home is truly in harmony with its environment and its owners.

McClintock House by Clarkson Architects

Housing Award: McClintock House by Clarkson Architects. Image:  Richard Brimmer

This strong and elegant house drapes its roof forms over a cleverly resolved plan. Respectful of its context, the exterior massing and scale provides privacy, volume and light for the occupants on the narrow, sloped site. The flow of spaces and varying degrees of openness and connection to outdoor private spaces makes it very enjoyable to inhabit this house.

PLANNING AND URBAN DESIGN AWARD:

Paxies Lane by Paris Magdalinos Architects

Planning and Urban Design Award: Paxies Lane by Paris Magdalinos Architects. Image:  Jeff Brass

This newly formed pedestrian street feels open, light, vibrant and inviting. The well-detailed Paxie building addition, along with the considered bulking and the stepping up of the other buildings with the slope of the land, enhance the space that has been created. The framing of the tree at the end to give a focal point and the use of the seating ledge against the hard wall add to the thoughtful experience of an urban journey.

PUBLIC ARCHITECTURE AWARD:

The Blyth Performing Arts Centre by Stevens Lawson Architects

Public Architecture Award: The Blyth Performing Arts Centre by Stevens Lawson Architects. Image:  Mark Smith

This stand-alone building commands attention from the moment you enter the school gates. The strong, sculptured exterior shape, reminiscent of the case of a musical instrument, is thoughtfully reflected in the building’s interior. From the soaring foyer space that connects you to the outside with its lovely relationship to an existing tree, through to the auditorium space, the building benefits from a deceptively simple language and form, expressed in a very honest way. Details and materials have been carefully considered to impart warmth and sensitivity and express a human scale.

SMALL PROJECT ARCHITECTURE AWARDS:

John’s House Pavilion by Bossley Architects and Citrus Studio in association

Small Project Architecture Award: John’s House Pavilion by Bossley Architects and Citrus Studio. Image:  Jodie Robertson

This single bedroom, self-contained retreat is deliberately sited in direct conversation with an adjacent John Scott dwelling. Rather than imitating that house’s complex geometry it uses simplicity of form and subtle references to its neighbour. Most striking is the large extended roof which is both folded and highlighted in a yellow triangulated soffit referencing the red ceilings of the existing house. This pavilion is a perfect space for reviving the soul and is reminiscent of the inflected panel paintings of James Ross.

William Nelson Park Public Toilet by Citrus Studio Architecture

Small Project Architecture Award: William Nelson Park Public Toilet by Citrus Studio Architecture. Image:  Supplied

The thoughtful siting of this facility not only anchors one of the corners of the park but also reinforces its secondary entry. The well-considered building form is expressed using materials and details of human scale, providing a sense of texture, play and delight. The continuation of the wall battens to the roof of the structure is also clever, allowing for good ventilation and security.

Resene Colour Award:
Well-considered colours inspired by the palette of the neighbouring playground not only reinforce the material choices but also help express the form of the building. The use of primary colours, yellow in particular, commands attention but also adds joy to what could have been a purely functional building.

All winners of 2015 Gisborne-Hawkes Bay Architecture Awards will be considered for the 2015 New Zealand Architecture Awards, which will be announced this November.


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