2017 Waikato–Bay of Plenty Architecture Awards

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Commercial winner: South Bloc, Hamilton by Edwards White Architects.

Commercial winner: South Bloc, Hamilton by Edwards White Architects. Image: Jason Haselden

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Commercial winner: CUBRO, Tauranga by Wingate Architects.

Commercial winner: CUBRO, Tauranga by Wingate Architects. Image: Amanda Aitken

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Education winner: Tarawera High School, Kawerau by RTA Studio.

Education winner: Tarawera High School, Kawerau by RTA Studio. Image: Patrick Reynolds

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Education winner: New Law & Management Building, University of Waikato, Hamilton by Opus Architecture.

Education winner: New Law & Management Building, University of Waikato, Hamilton by Opus Architecture. Image: Stephen Barker

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Enduring Architecture winner: Karewa Parade House, Papamoa by David Page Architect (1972).

Enduring Architecture winner: Karewa Parade House, Papamoa by David Page Architect (1972).

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Enduring Architecture winner: Miller House (1969), Hamilton by Rod Smith Architect (Smith, Grant and Associates).

Enduring Architecture winner: Miller House (1969), Hamilton by Rod Smith Architect (Smith, Grant and Associates).

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Hospitality & Retail winner: The Kinloch Club by Patterson Associates.

Hospitality & Retail winner: The Kinloch Club by Patterson Associates. Image: Patterson Associates

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Hospitality & Retail winner: Papamoa Plaza, Mount Maunganui by Ignite Architects.

Hospitality & Retail winner: Papamoa Plaza, Mount Maunganui by Ignite Architects. Image: Amanda Aitken

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Housing winner: Town House, Cambridge by Christopher Beer Architect.

Housing winner: Town House, Cambridge by Christopher Beer Architect. Image: Jeremy Toth

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Housing winner: Andrews Family Home, Taupō by Bull O'Sullivan Architecture.

Housing winner: Andrews Family Home, Taupō by Bull O’Sullivan Architecture. Image: Sou Muy Ly

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Housing winner: The Splay House, Hamilton by Edwards White Architects.

Housing winner: The Splay House, Hamilton by Edwards White Architects. Image: Brian White

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Housing winner: Farquhar House, Whangapoua by Alignworks.

Housing winner: Farquhar House, Whangapoua by Alignworks. Image: Steve May

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Housing winner: Sentinel House, Coromandel by Crosson Architects.

Housing winner: Sentinel House, Coromandel by Crosson Architects. Image: Samuel Hartnett

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Housing winner: Paerata Ridge House, Waiotahe by Architecture Page Henderson.

Housing winner: Paerata Ridge House, Waiotahe by Architecture Page Henderson. Image: Guy Hastings

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Housing winner: Pauanui Bach by Leuschke Kahn Architects.

Housing winner: Pauanui Bach by Leuschke Kahn Architects. Image: Jamie Cobel

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Housing Alterations & Additions winner: Architect's Own by Architecture Bureau.

Housing Alterations & Additions winner: Architect’s Own by Architecture Bureau. Image: Simon Devitt

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Interior Architecture winner: IT Partners Office Fitout, Hamilton by Edwards White Architects.

Interior Architecture winner: IT Partners Office Fitout, Hamilton by Edwards White Architects. Image: Jason Haselden

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Planning & Urban Design winner: Embassy Park, Hamilton by PAUA Architects.

Planning & Urban Design winner: Embassy Park, Hamilton by PAUA Architects.

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Public Architecture winner: St Johns Church, Hamilton East by MOAA Architects.

Public Architecture winner: St Johns Church, Hamilton East by MOAA Architects. Image: Jeremy Toth

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19 projects across nine categories were rewarded at the 2017 Waikato–Bay of Plenty Architecture Awards, announced at an event held at Tauranga Art Gallery on Friday 28 April.

Awards convenor and Hamilton-based architect Steven Chambers said that despite the diversity of the 25 projects Chambers’ jury visited, there was one thing the award-winners had in common.

“At each property we visited it was a delight to see the architects and their clients revelling in the fantastic environments they had created. It was a testimony to the positive relationships that were formed right at the very start of each project, when briefs were written and concepts were investigated,” says Chambers.

Chambers was joined on the jury by Nelson architect Andrew Irving and experienced Waikato/Bay of Plenty architects Belinda Ellis and Jane Hill.

Full list of winners with jury citations below.

Commercial winner: South Bloc, Hamilton by Edwards White Architects. Image:  Jason Haselden

COMMERCIAL ARCHITECTURE AWARDS:

South Bloc by Edwards White Architects

Through a considered process of rediscovery and removal, the architects have taken this building back to its strong modernist bones, reinstating and reimagining its presence to the street. Crafted materials and subtle recycling create light-filled, flexible and enjoyable spaces. This project adds immensely to the built quality of Hamilton’s CBD.

Commercial winner: CUBRO, Tauranga by Wingate Architects. Image:  Amanda Aitken

CUBRO by Wingate Architects 

This manufacturing, showroom and office centre has become a flagship for client, contractor and architect collaboration. The rich quality of the interior spaces belies the simple logic to interior planning. The use of high-quality materials, balanced with architectural restraint, has resulted in a strong and successfully composed façade that will age gracefully on a prominent site.

EDUCATION AWARDS:

Education winner: Tarawera High School, Kawerau by RTA Studio. Image:  Patrick Reynolds

Tarawera High School by RTA Studio 

This inspiring exemplar of architecture embedded in place and community exceeds the potential limitations of budget to deliver uplifting and authentic innovative learning environments. The architect has creatively subverted the traditional education palette with a high level of care and detail. Colour is integral to this project, and has been used to connect the architecture with the school’s values and to the community and landscape within which the school sits.

Resene Colour Award:
The well-handled use of strong colours works seamlessly with the architecture while reflecting the connection of the users with the nearby river, surrounding landscape and other natural elements of the area.

Education winner: New Law & Management Building, University of Waikato, Hamilton by Opus Architecture. Image:  Stephen Barker

New Law & Management Building, University of Waikato by Opus Architecture

This large-scale complex project asserts itself boldly on its corner site, communicating both permanence and quality through its formal and material qualities. It is a powerful expression of solid mass and void, and the journey through the building offers a discovery of space, light and connection. The sunken courtyard and grass roof have cleverly given the building space to breathe and allowed visual connection through to the hills beyond. The admission of natural light deep into the building, and a commitment to sustainable design principles, is perfectly appropriate to this academic environment.

ENDURING ARCHITECTURE AWARDS:

Enduring Architecture winner: Karewa Parade House, Papamoa by David Page Architect (1972).

Karewa Parade House (1972) by David Page Architect 

Designed in 1972 as his parents’ beach bach when the architect was a young graduate, this delightful time capsule is still in the family. As a testament to the design resolve, the bach has been unaltered, with the exception of an art studio added a year after completion. Every nook of this complex volume is occupied and enjoyed, and represents a crafted example of an architectural typology that has now come full circle – the tiny house. Simple materials innovatively and elegantly assembled reflect the patina of wear in a bach that sensitively occupies its coastal site, working with the natural undulations of the dunes.

Enduring Architecture winner: Miller House (1969), Hamilton by Rod Smith Architect (Smith, Grant and Associates).

Miller House (1969) by Rod Smith Architect (Smith, Grant and Associates)

This truly is a gracious family home rediscovered. The current owner has had a penchant for the architect’s work since his early 20’s and leapt at the opportunity to purchase this home. Lovingly restored in great detail to its former glory, and undergoing a considered reworking, the house has been updated to allow a modern family to occupy it comfortably. Strong external forms and exquisite interior timber detailing and rhythm showcases the house’s inherent beauty. The house will easily last for many generations to come.

Hospitality & Retail winner: The Kinloch Club by Patterson Associates. Image:  Patterson Associates

HOSPITALITY & RETAIL AWARDS:

The Kinloch Club by Patterson Associates

Materially and spatially rich, this project responds beautifully to its harsh lakeside setting. Patterson Associates has demonstrated its expertise across the full range of an architect’s palette, working with form, scale, depth, light, texture and weight to create truly memorable experiences. Impeccable detailing reflects the design team’s commitment to creating environments that are dramatic yet comfortable, lavish yet not ostentatious, and that yield spaces with a human quality and sense of welcome.

Hospitality & Retail winner: Papamoa Plaza, Mount Maunganui by Ignite Architects. Image:  Amanda Aitken

Papamoa Plaza by Ignite Architects

The architects have extended and refurbished an existing shopping centre with a commitment to returning a sense of place to a previously context-less mall. Strategically freeing the foodcourt from the interior allows it to occupy a light-filled, glazed public edge and addresses the interface between building and carpark well. A relevant canopy defines and articulates an active pedestrian edge resulting in a successful intervention that bridges the divide between community space and typical faceless suburban mall.

HOUSING AWARDS:

Housing winner: Town House, Cambridge by Christopher Beer Architect. Image:  Jeremy Toth

Townhouse by Christopher Beer Architect 

A refreshing take on the urban residential typology, this house intelligently explores the boundaries between public and private space. Three courtyards offset by three volumes create a sophisticated array of internal and external spaces that engage with the whole site, leaving no square metre wanting. Tight budget constraints have driven innovative craftsmanship, enhanced by simple materials which slip inside and outside, from low to high; the architect has kept a tight command of sightlines and scale in designing a dramatic home that is a treasure to inhabit.

Housing winner: Andrews Family Home, Taupō by Bull O’Sullivan Architecture. Image:  Sou Muy Ly

Andrews Family Home by Bull O’Sullivan Architecture 

This suburban home cleverly connects with the site context whilst maintaining privacy and intimacy. The architect pulls a complex fly roof over a simply expressed plan arrangement and revels in the resulting spatial complexity. Seemingly simple materials have been reimagined through beautiful detailing, creating rich and warm interiors that offer delight at every turn.

Housing winner: The Splay House, Hamilton by Edwards White Architects. Image:  Brian White

The Splay House by Edwards White Architects 

Located in suburbia with a hidden gully edge, this house utilises a bold unfolding site strategy that maximises interior and exterior space. The simple sculptural forms radiate around a generous central living court, creating intimate connections between all spaces. This is an excellent example of standard construction methodology expressed with considered material craft.

Farquhar House by Alignworks 

Housing winner: Farquhar House, Whangapoua by Alignworks. Image:  Steve May

A good fit with its casual beachfront surrounds, this prefabricated building redefines how ‘bespoke’ and ‘prefab’ can co-exist within residential design. The house is sensitive to its surroundings; spaces ebb and flow through subtle changes in level and interconnection. Light-filled, and with materials that hark back to the bach, the house benefits from the architect’s use of a soft interior and colour palette, elegantly deployed to enhance the notion of holiday.

Resene Colour Award:
The interior and exterior colour selections harmonise the house with the hues of a pre-existing gum tree on site while also reflecting the relaxed beachside atmosphere through muted accents and pops of colour.

Housing winner: Sentinel House, Coromandel by Crosson Architects. Image:  Samuel Hartnett

Sentinel House by Crosson Architects 

This bold sculptural form in the landscape is an appropriate solution for a family of artists/curators. A simple vessel that contains sophisticated space uses a restrained material approach, reflective of the owners’ love of pottery. It plays beautifully with scale, texture and light to create spaces that are a delight to inhabit. This project celebrates a highly creative couple; the clients have gained immense value from engaging an attentive architect.

Housing winner: Paerata Ridge House, Waiotahe by Architecture Page Henderson. Image:  Guy Hastings

Paerata Ridge House by Architecture Page Henderson 

In this working ‘farmhouse’ discrete forms are arranged as a cluster of buildings oriented toward the north and extensive views. Simple, honest farm shed materials are imbued with colours that embed the building within its site and its wider environment. Pragmatic as well as elegant, the house explores a sensible environmental strategy of passive systems and power generation that supports farm operation. The space planning reflects the day-to-day running of a rural property, with an appropriate hierarchy of private to public spaces that works perfectly for an extremely happy client.

Housing winner: Pauanui Bach by Leuschke Kahn Architects. Image:  Jamie Cobel

Pauanui Bach by Leuschke Kahn Architects 

Approached as if squeezing between a group of tents, this elegant assembly of three lean-to roofs unfolds around a sun-filled courtyard. Communal areas support inside and outside space, facilitating large gatherings around the kitchen or ‘campfire’. Carefully selected views connect the occupants to immediate, close and distant hillsides from a variety of spaces. The hierarchy of building forms makes sense of the building cluster and allows sunlight to penetrate the social spaces.

HOUSING ALTERATIONS & ADDITIONS AWARD:

Housing Alterations & Additions winner: Architect’s Own by Architecture Bureau. Image:  Simon Devitt

Architect’s Own by Architecture Bureau

A carefully executed celebration of classic Waikato vernacular allows this house to support layers of family life in a seamless and elegant manner. This significant alteration has been sensitively handled with admirable consideration given to the relationship of old to new, upstairs to downstairs, and house to garden. The architect’s approach has been respectful of the past with detailing and selections while also making a clear nod to the future; the result is a house that could successfully be a forever home.

INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE AWARD:

Interior Architecture winner: IT Partners Office Fitout, Hamilton by Edwards White Architects. Image:  Jason Haselden

IT Partners Office Fitout by Edwards White Architects 

A well-handled interior fitout creates a fresh vibe for a progressive IT company. The long and narrow floor plate has been addressed effortlessly with simplicity and restraint, allowing the occupants to truly own their workplace. The architect’s rigorous hand in the design of lighting and services enhances the pared back philosophy applied to the space.

PLANNING & URBAN DESIGN AWARD:

Planning & Urban Design winner: Embassy Park, Hamilton by PAUA Architects.

Embassy Park by PAUA Architects

This necessary urban intervention has opened up and occupied a once neglected city park, demonstrating the positive role of the architect in community initiatives. While this pocket park is yet to be fully realised, it establishes a framework for long-term reinhabitation, and provides a model for future stages and wider projects within the Hamilton CBD.

PUBLIC ARCHITECTURE AWARD:

Public Architecture winner: St Johns Church, Hamilton East by MOAA Architects. Image:  Jeremy Toth

St Johns Church by MOAA Architects 

This new congregational space connected to the existing church is a delightfully unexpected addition. The architect’s selection and use of a structural language acts to humanise and soften the interior space, producing a handcrafted modesty, fit for purpose. The make-up of the facade – an offset timber screen, glazing and weathered steel – and a simple shift in plan orientation gives this building a sense of permanence. It seems as if has always been part of this community, embedded in its site and watching over the adjacent park.

All winners of the 2017 Waikato–Bay of Plenty Architecture Awards are eligible for shortlisting in the New Zealand Architecture Awards, which will be decided later in the year, and announced in November. 


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